Who left the oven on?

Screen Shot 2016-05-18 at 22.27.53At school drop-off this morning, the usual line-up of big cars jostled for position up and down the length of the road. This nearly always involves double-parking then running into school at lightning speed to deposit Son2, before hot-footing it back to move my vehicle.

I’m Speedy Gonzales. The last thing you want at that ungodly-hour of the morning is to get back to your car and find you’ve blocked someone in who has a dental (or hair) appointment to get to. I’ve messed up before – a mum was waiting for me, her penciled-on eyebrows hovering somewhere near her hairline. We had ‘words’. Never again.

This morning, I glanced at the woman parked in front of me as she grappled with a shiny, metallic-silver sunshade. She attached it to her car’s windshield as though she was blindfolding the window. It’s common practice here if you’re leaving your car outdoors all day. Apparently the deflective heat shield stops the dashboard losing its colour in the UV light. Whether it also means you can hold the steering wheel without being burnt when you return to your car, I’m not sure.

Screen Shot 2016-05-18 at 22.29.55
Breathing through hot, sticky treacle takes a little know-how 

We’ve reached that time of year, you see. When you step out of your car into the heat of the morning and it’s only 7.45am. You lock the doors with a click and breathe in air that’s already heavy – thick with a cloying sultriness that turns your car into an oven while stationary.

 

At work, I’ve noticed the journalists don’t particularly want to go out to meetings anymore. I don’t have too far to walk from the car to my office building, but by the time I enter the wide, glass doors, there are already beads of perspiration forming in the fine lines on my forehead and between my shoulder blades. The office, in contrast, is blissfully cool and I take a moment to enjoy the feel of the air-conditioning hitting my skin.

I feel very lucky, actually, to be in work when the temperature rises. As well as AC, there’s a circular Dyson fan mounted on a pedestal, which somehow cleverly wafts a breeze over without any moving blades. You can even put your head in it. In fact, I hear more complaints at work about being cold. When my friend texted today to say she was ‘dying sweating by the swimming pool while her boys had their swim lessons’, I thanked my lucky stars.

But still – we had a good, long stretch of perfect, cooler weather (5 months), and all the cloud seeding the UAE has being doing to make it rain has been much appreciated.

Dubai summer – I’m ready for you. Until I’m back on afternoon school-run duties during the hottest, sweatiest part of the day.

7 thoughts on “Who left the oven on?

  1. I can feel the heat from your post…
    I remember those windscreen blind things from when I was in Doha. I found it invaluable for keeping the steering wheel just on the cool side of burning hot, so that I could actually touch it. 🙂

    • So they do work! I’ve never actually tried one – but I think I will now. Yes, it’s getting miserable here now!! I don’t know why it still takes me by surprise every year.

      • Oh yes, they definitely worked. The one I had was like a roller blind which was fixed on the inside of the windscreen and when I parked I rolled it across and attached it to a hook on the other side. I brought one home with me and it lasted for years which was great.

  2. Totally agree! But I still fail to understand how the labourers work up there on those metal frames in the scorching sun for super long hours and then when their loaded buses stop next to you at the traffic lights with heads popping out of each and every possible window available whilst we are still strenuously battling with the AC dash vents..

  3. magsah says:

    Hi Marianne, loving your blogs.. Nominated you on Alhan for Best blogs. Good Luck girl !

    Maggie x

    On Wed, May 18, 2016 at 11:39 PM, “CIRCLES IN THE SAND … Marianne Makdisi” wrote:

    > Circles in the Sand posted: “At school drop-off this morning, the usual > line-up of big cars jostled for position up and down the length of the > road. This nearly always involves double-parking then running into school > at lightning speed to deposit Son2, before hot-footing it back to m” >

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